Tag Archives: English Literature in the Sixteenth Century

The Words C.S. Lewis Made Up: Re/Anti/Un/Ness

Behind C.S. Lewis’ famous Narnian chronicles was his experience as a teacher of English literature, a writer about the history of literary movements, and a tinker in other forms of fiction. In that tinkering, and in his letters and essays, … Continue reading

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The Words C.S. Lewis Made Up: Part 1: Bulverism

As far as I know, Lewis never used the phrase, “wordsmith.” When it comes to writing, he preferred images of stone, greenery, and song to metaphors of fire and steel. Yet there were times that Lewis turned to the forge … Continue reading

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George Watson’s Provocative Comments on C.S. Lewis as Literary Critic

One of the advantages of finding new libraries is that the librarian’s skill of book-buying is more art than science. The librarians I know, despite their adept use of analytics, have as much curator or architect in them as they … Continue reading

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“Down In The Depth Of Mine Iniquity” by Fulke Greville

Baron Fulke Greville was one of the 1550s boys–one of those men born during the tumultuous period in the transition of the child king Edward VI to the prosecutor, Bloody Mary, to the stabilizing Queen Elizabeth. Born in that decade … Continue reading

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On Reading The Faerie Queene for the First Time

The Faerie Queene fits in the category of important books so big that they often stay in our “to read” pile for years on end. I still haven’t read Ulysses by Joyce, which is only as long as a Stephen … Continue reading

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